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What My Unique Beauty Feature Taught Me

What My Unique Beauty Feature Taught Me

It’s no secret that beauty comes in all shapes, colors and sizes. But it’s the quirks that truly bring out a woman’s individuality and helps shape her personality. Whether it’s a freckle-covered nose, a head full of gray strands or a gap-toothed smile, unique features are what make us fascinating.

Beauty for a Purpose spoke with five bloggers whose little idiosyncrasies helped propel them into becoming the proud, confident and fearless women they are today.

I'esha Hornes Unique beauty feature Photo Courtesy of I'esha Hornes

The secret's in the smile

“Growing up, I faced bullying and ridicule about my gap from other children at school and even my own family members. I was constantly told I needed to get my teeth fixed—that I was ugly and shouldn't smile so much or laugh too loudly. It was hurtful. All I wanted was to close the gap. But as I got older, I realized how unique my gap made me. I started to love the idea that because of my gap, people rarely ever forgot my face. Unlike everyone else with perfectly straight teeth, the gap eventually became my trademark.” — I’esha Hornes, blogger GaptoothDiva.com

Jennifer Cole Unique beauty feature Photo Courtesy of Jennifer Cole

Power to the freckles

“As a child I was always marveled at for my unique hue and freckles. It made me feel special and spunky. It wasn't until middle school, and the years to follow, that I started to be mocked for looking different. Now as an adult, I feel beautiful in the summer months when my spots spread like wildfire, covering my body head to toe, and my hair shines with red highlights. There's this idea that sticking to the norm is simple and safe. My hair and freckles are a reminder that change is beautiful and refreshing.” — Jennifer M. Cole, magazine editor and health/wellness blogger

Cynthia Coco Anetor-Sokei Unique beauty feature Photo by Ken Ansem of T.E.N.

More than skin deep

“I knew from a very young age that I looked different—for a long time I felt unattractive and uncomfortable in my skin. But my entire family made me feel like having albinism, a defect of melanin production, was a gift. Being around loved ones makes me feel beautiful. They never fail to gush over something about me. My confidence is a work in progress, but I know I’m pretty amazing!” — Cynthia Coco Anetor-Sokei, blogger Albimazing.com

Ty Alexander Unique beauty feature Photo by Lydia Hydgens

Gray is good

“The first gray I remember was as a teenager, but my mother would have told you I was born with gray hair. My mother had gray hair so I never thought of it as a bad thing. I dyed my hair in high school because...high school. But when I turned 25, I decided to let the grays come out. It was in my destiny to be a gray-haired diva. I truly came into my own in my thirties. I caught a case of the ‘I don't care what you think’ and I haven’t been able to shake it!” —Ty Alexander, blogger/writer/on-air personality, Gorgeous In Grey.com

Carolyn Henderson Unique beauty feature Photo courtesy of Carolyn Henderson

Confidence right under the nose

“As a child I had always had a cute button nose but as I grew, so did my nose! Going through my teenage years I became very aware of my looks and always drew comparisons with others. As I grew older, I developed my own sense of style and found myself getting more attention. A bit of external reassurance is helpful, but you cannot rely on it to grow your own confidence, it has to come from within. I care a lot less now about what others think of me, I'm not impermeable, but I'm definitely a lot more carefree. Plus, I love that my nose suits my face. It may be long with a bump in the middle, but it fits my face shape. It's unique to me and it makes me different from anyone else!” —Carolyn Henderson, beauty, fashion and lifestyle blogger, ForeverScarlet.com

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